how to keep bobcats away from chickens

If you really can’t stand to see another ad again, then please consider supporting our work with a contribution to wikiHow. Have them interact through a fence or enclosure for a few weeks. Guineas are not quiet animals, and you cannot train them to pipe down like you can with (some) dogs. How to Protect Chickens from Feral Animals, http://www.grit.com/animals/predators-of-chickens?pageid=2#PageContent2, http://www.ci.brainerd.mn.us/DocumentCenter/Home/View/469, http://articles.extension.org/pages/71204/predator-management-for-small-and-backyard-poultry-flocks, https://www.backyardchickencoops.com.au/can-you-keep-cats-and-chickens-together-in-the-same-backyard, proteger a los pollos de los animales salvajes, consider supporting our work with a contribution to wikiHow. The first order of business is to have a secure coop with a door that shuts securely at night. Learn more... Chickens can be very vulnerable to predators such as foxes, coyotes, and other carnivores. Lauren Arcuri is a freelance writer and an experienced small farmer. Planting bushes and allowing your chickens access under decks and overhangs is essential when they free range. Then, try a face-to-face interaction in which the chicken and cat are both restrained. Bury it a few inches below the ground's surface. Purchase a humane and specifically-built trap from a hardware or ranch store to trap any imposing snakes that enter the coop. they have a broad range and the birds need secure housing and runs. When you see chickens wander into your garden, give them a quick spray with a standard garden hose. The final layer of predator protection is a gun. It's important to repair damages and to reinforce the coop with chicken wire. If you have fruit trees near your chicken coop, be on the lookout for fallen fruit. If you're not familiar with building fences or working with electronics, have the fence installed professionally. The bobcat could be lured to your yard by the smell of the chickens, so keeping the coop extra clean will help. One thing to remember: chicken wire will keep chickens in; hardware mesh will keep predators out. Can you keep them in a barn instead of a pen? % of people told us that this article helped them. The first method is to have a static coop and run an electric wire around the bottom of the coop in such a way that even digging predators cannot get in. How to keep bobcats from killing your pets As modern as the world may be, wildlife still abounds. Here are some ways you can keep bobcats out of your yard, away from your property and out of your chicken coop: Natural Deterrents. Just make sure not to keep a schedule when letting the dog out if it’s an indoor dog. Read our Bobcats are notorious for leaping at a high level and climbing fences. Here are the most common chicken predators: Some predators, like snakes and rats, are only likely to eat baby chicks or half-grown pullets, not full-grown birds. A given area will typically have just a few predators around, and the ones that are present may naturally … Others, such as skunks, will just eat chicken eggs and will leave the hens alone. Where to Buy Baby Chickens and Other Poultry Online, How to Raise and Keep Broody Hens for Eggs, Easy Chicken Care Tasks to Make Part of Your Routine, Chicken Breeds for the Small Farm or Backyard Flock, You Can Design and Build Your Own Portable Chicken Coop, Start a Chicken Broiler Business on Your Small Farm, Keep Your Chicken Coop Smelling Fresh and Clean, 6 Poultry Health Problems (and How to Deal With Them). It connects to your garden hose and has a stake for sticking it securely in the ground. Another option is to use electric net fencing to protect your chickens. So, how do you protect your flock so you do not have to worry about losing your poultry stock to raccoons, dogs, weasels, hawks, and more? If you do not give this issue attention, unfortunately, you may have a gruesome discovery come morning when you feed the flock. Thanks to all authors for creating a page that has been read 66,489 times. If you are new to raising chickens, you might not even be aware of what predators are around. But domestic animals can be chicken killers, too. Please help us continue to provide you with our trusted how-to guides and videos for free by whitelisting wikiHow on your ad blocker. They don’t leave much of a trace because they are able to carry your chickens off without much disturbance. I recommend it. Use chicken wire or hardware cloth as an effective barrier against predatory birds. New cats and kittens can be introduced to chickens gradually, especially at a young age. How do I get it to stop coming in our yard? Without getting into the politics of gun ownership, shooting the offending animal or firing a shotgun in the direction of the offending predator will certainly scare away or get rid of the problem. Avoid chicken wire, as this material is designed to keep chickens in rather than keeping predators out. Step 4: Keep your coop and run clean. If you're worried that your chicken coop isn't secure enough, consider building or buying a new one that's elevated off the ground and covered with a roof, which will help keep out most predators. If you have such a pond and want to keep bobcats from fishing out prize turtles or fish, set up a MOTION ACTIVATED WATER SPRAYER. A large breed dog that gets on well with your chickens can be an excellent deterrent from not only birds of prey, but other predators. Please help! Keep your compost pile far away from the coop. This is not to keep the chickens in but to keep the predators out. Some dogs, playful creatures that they are, just love to chase and tease chickens. To learn how to use a cat or dog to guard your chickens, scroll down! Use a fine mesh hardware cloth (1/2” to 1/4”) to fence the coop which is more effective in preventing bobcats from reaching into it. Small opening or holes along the coop can make an easy entrance for small predators alike. You may need to invest in a taller fence, and ensure your chickens' run has a roof over the top. wikiHow is where trusted research and expert knowledge come together. Predators are stopped, right down to the ground, and the management system of moving your chickens to fresh pasture seems to be an additional effective deterrent. Put a roof on it. As you can imagine, a chicken – or even several chickens – stand no chance against a bobcat if it is able to get close enough to grab a hold of them. But bobcats can crawl under fences and are very determined to find their prey at night. Coyotes also tend to attack in the nighttime, so you can further prevent them from harming your chickens by keeping them in an enclosed coop after sunset. If anything is taking them during the day a livestock guardian dog or even other dog breeds can protect them. Put lights around the coop at night; motion-sensor lights work well. Simply sprinkle or spray on ground. Spray the chickens with water. There is a catch about dogs, however. You do not want to simply make predators another person's problem. Fencing must be at least six feet high with the bottom extending 6-12 inches below ground level. Every day a chicken or goats gets taken away by a bobcat and there is nothing I can do since I am only 15 years old. Live traps are another option, but many chicken owners choose to avoid this until they’ve directly observed a predator attacking their flock. It is similar to chicken wire but sturdier. Protecting chickens requires a little forethought and some regular maintenance. Last Updated: September 8, 2020 It seems that nearly every wild creature, and many domestic ones, can appreciate a delicious chicken dinner. Instead, invest in a welded wire hardware cloth. You should also make sure to release animals like skunks and raccoons far away from other people's homes. Guns can serve a purpose on the homestead and a farm. Image by frank2037. Also, strengthen your chicken coop to keep the bobcats out. If the weasel was not dispatched it is highly likely it would have come back night after night to feast on nicely fatted hens. When a hawk tries to dive through the wire or mesh, it becomes entangled, and your chickens have time to run away. They also have a powerful sense of smell and hearing, so they’ll be aware from a long distance away if you have chickens. When building your run, make sure you bury hardware mesh at least 2 feet deep around the compound- 4 feet deep would be ideal. Build the right structures to keep predators out. It is hard to determine if a hawk has preyed upon your chickens. There are several ways to set it up. These 17 tips will help keep your ducks and chickens safe from predators in your back yard. Letting them out at random will ensure the hawks remain cautious. Bobcats and coyotes are fantastic jumpers and can easily clear 4-foot-high fences, so build your enclosure appropriately tall, or add a cover net to keep the varmints from vaulting the fence. Your fence should be at least five feet high to protect your chickens. We know ads can be annoying, but they’re what allow us to make all of wikiHow available for free. If you find that the chicken wire holes/opening are too wide, and the wire infirm, upgrade to 1/4" hardware cloth. Their sharp claws come out during the hunt to make the kill. Avoid chicken wire, as this material is designed to keep chickens in rather than keeping predators out. How do I add protection to a pre-made coop? The Bobcat ranked number 9 in our Worst Predator Poll! As featured in Backyard Poultry & The Chicken Whisperer, PredatorPee's chicken coop predator protection products work to keep your flock safe.Because chickens have a weak sense of smell, urine from animals like bobcats, coyotes, and wolves does not effect them at all - but the pests will stay away! Another option is an automatic coop door. Elevate the coop off the ground to help prevent mice, rats, and weasels from getting into the coop. Or you can bury the hardware cloth straight down 12-18 inches deep into the ground. Instead, invest in a welded wire hardware cloth. You should bury about six inches of fencing wire under the ground to protect your chickens. Mow the grass or field near or around the coop. These can attract coyotes and bring them closer to your chicken 9) Bobcats. One idea would be to rig your property so a bell or some sort of alarm would go off when the bobcats trip a wire. An open field without cover is a deterrent to predators. I am A farm girl and I am deaply attached to animals. You can also invest in traps and guard dogs to repel predators. Inspect the bottom of the coop and patch any holes where predators could gain entry. There are other ways to protect poultry and some of them will work for any animal on the farm. Unless you're very familiar with building yourself, it's best to have professionals build your chicken coop. Add an angle at the top facing outward at 45 degrees, and 16 inches in width. The young Llama grows up with the flock and sees them as ‘family’ and will apparently chase foxes away! Is there any way your family can bobcat proof the chicken coop. Consider motion-controlled spraying as well. So, what animals should you protect your chickens against? But beware, their protection comes with a noisy price. 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